Sunday, March 27, 2011

We are all Wretched

According to the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops, we are no longer wretched sinners. Now we just need to be strengthened. Today, for the closing hymn, our choir sang Amazing Grace, at least what's left of it after it fell under the axe of the CCCB.

The opening lines that we are so familiar with are supposed to go like this:

Amazing grace, how sweet the sound, that saved a wretch like me.

But now they read:

Amazing grace how sweet the sound, that saved and strengthened me.

Excuse me, I'm about to be sick. Good old Catholic Book of Modern Worship.

9 comments:

Michele said...

well, look on the postive side, you are a traditional catholic. just remind yourself of that when you hear the modernist version :)

ignorant redneck said...

Don't feel like the lone stranger up there! I have just about quit paying attention to the USCCB--If it isn't from the Vatican, with an authoritative signature, I blow it off.

Some of the stuff the Anglophone and Francophone Bishops come up with has to be sourced from the bottom of a box of Cracker Jacks!

Shirley said...

Move over, I need room to "retch" too!

kam said...

Even at our Traditional Latin Mass here in CT this morning the words were changed on a traditional catholic hymn, not even a protestant substitute.

Michele said...

i go to an SSPX Mass, and i never heard anything being changed. i have to hand it to them, they really stick to tradition! the priests are extremely holy. especially our priest!

Amanda Borenstadt said...

Yikes! They changed the words??? That's just not right. :(

I'd just sing it the correct way anyhow.

Shandon Belle said...

Faith of our fathers, living still, in spite of John XXIII!!!

Patrick said...

So we're no longer allowed to remind ourselves that we are sinners. What's next? :o

lightsnaps said...

I'm not a Catholic (and nor is this a Catholic hymn as far as I know) but I don't mind the changed wording. I was left wondering about the copyright more than anything :). One simply can't change works written by others without consent or acknowledgement. Language is always a strange thing.