Saturday, May 05, 2007

Regarding Women Priests...

This about sums it up.

From a question posed to Cardinal Arinze at a conference sponsored by the Apostolate for Family Consecration.

Q. In the history of the Church, were there ever women priests? Women can't be made priests, at any time; even the pope can't do that, can he?

A. No, the pope issued a document, Ordinatio Sacerdotalis saying that the Church has no power to ordain women priests. There were never women priests in the Church. If Christ would have wanted women to be priests, His Blessed Mother surely should have been number one.

10 comments:

marilena said...

honestly, i don't think there'll ever be a female priest at any Catholic Mass. be it NO or TLM. if there is, well, i would just shake my head in sorrow. i can tell you that at an SSPX Mass, there'll never be a female priest. iam glad i attend a traditional Latin Mass!
i think the NO has alot of protestantism in it. the SSPX TLM doesn't. for that iam greatful beyond words! i love the TLM, and would not go back to a NO regularly again. no way. if i was visting a city, and there was no TLM availble, then yes, i would go. but i'd still wear my modest clothing. I would search for a reverent NO. i don't think i could go to one if it wasn't reverent. not after being at the SSPX for a year now. i don't misas the NO at all. i really don't.

Simon-Peter Vickers-Buckley said...

So dumb.

I wish they'd ask: in the entire history of God's dealings with man through Israel and then the Church has there ever been a woman priest.

NO!

Has a man ever given birth to a baby?

NO!

The Pope has no more power to cause one than the other.

Anita Moore said...

Well, how we get around Ordinatio Sacerdotalis is by claiming that it isn't a definitive statement, because the Pope didn't use precisely the right magic words to speak ex cathedra, or because this isn't a subject to which infallibility applies.

Still, when the rubber meets the road, this is pretty hard to get around:

I declare that the Church has no authority whatsoever to confer priestly ordination on women and that this judgment is to be definitively held by all the Church's faithful.

P.S. All you women out there who want to be priestesses, ask yourselves: do you want this for the same reason a man would want it? Do you want it for the same reasons St. John Vianney or Padre Pio or St. Maximilian Kolbe wanted it? Think about it.

Simon-Peter Vickers-Buckley said...

Well...but it isn't necessary for dogma, to be dogma, that a Pope do so declare.

They want to be priests because it is about power to them, in this case especially the subconscious drive is power over God, the God-Man Jesus Christ, viz. the words of consecration.

paramedicgirl said...

They want to be priests because it is about power to them, in this case especially the subconscious drive is power over God, the God-Man Jesus Christ, viz. the words of consecration.

I couldn't agree more....

Dr. Bombay said...

The Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, headed by Ratzinger at the time, produced a responsum ad dubium of whether the teaching contained in Ordinatio Sacerdotalis is to be considered as part of the Deposit of Faith. In other words, if that teaching has always and everywhere been taught by the Church. The answer, not surprisingly, was yes. This was an exercise of the Church's infallibility in its ordinary and universal magisterium, as taught in VII's Lumen Gentium, not papal infallibility, though it all results in the same end. This is also why the Church's teaching prohibiting the use of artificial contraception is also an infallible statement.

In any event, as Anita notes, it's hard to get around the Holy Father's statement that "this judgment is to be definitively held by all the Church's faithful." But we wouldn't expect the pinch-mouths who advocate girl priests to pay attention to such things. Power is all they care about, as has been noted. They'd serve the Church much better if they could learn to cook some good meals and launder clothing for the hard working men in their lives.

paramedicgirl said...

They'd serve the Church much better if they could learn to cook some good meals and launder clothing for the hard working men in their lives.

ROTFL!!! It's just what they need!

Anita Moore said...

The Doc's got a point. We women actually forfeit our power as women when we try to be men.

Adoro te Devote said...

Women who want to be priests are all about power; that is the crux of their argument. It's not about service and humility, although they love to use the term "service", in the context they provide we can substitute the term "power" and see what they are really after.

It makes no sense for women to be priests; the Church is the Bride of Christ, and the priest stands in for the Bridegroom, that being Jesus.

As we know, same-sex unions do not produce offspring. Thus we cannot have a female leader for she would not be able to concieve spiritual fruit from her "fatherhood". It is simply against the natural order as ordained by God.

Priests are all about service, not power, and we have seen that those male priests who see their role as one of power actually have gone astray. Power and Pride are synonymous. Sacrifice, Love, and Humility are also synonymous...and those are the traits of a priest.

I have yet to see a woman seekign to be a priest who fulfills the latter desires, for she is always citing the oppression of men and the Church, meanign that she does not understand that her life is to be one of service and obedience.

I coudl go on and on...couldn't we all?

Theocoid said...

There are two kinds of infallible statements: dogma and definitive statements. Dogmatic statements are infallible statements that are Divinely revealed. Definitive statements are related to Divine revelation but not in themselves divine revelation.

While one could make a case for Ordinatio Sacerdotalis not being a dogmatic statement, it would be difficult to justify it not being a definitive statement, especially given that the words "to be definitively held" is used in the very wording of the declaration.

Following canon 750 §2, there's really no two ways about it.

"The college of bishops also possesses infallibility in teaching when the bishops gathered together in an ecumenical council exercise the magisterium as teachers and judges of faith and morals who declare for the universal Church that a doctrine of faith or morals is to be held definitively; or when dispersed throughout the world but preserving the bond of communion among themselves and with the successor of Peter and teaching authentically together with the Roman Pontiff matters of faith or morals, they agree that a particular proposition is to be held definitively."

It might not be dogma, but it's infallible.