Saturday, May 26, 2007

Reverence



Reverence. Silence. Wonder. Awe. These elements are often lacking at the Consecration, but if we could actually see what transpires at the altar, what would we do? How would we act?

St Gertrude the Great relates that at the elevation of the Host, she saw Christ with His own hands lifting on high His Heart in the form of a golden chalice, presenting it to His Heavenly Father and offering Himself for His Church in an ineffable manner, that is far beyond the comprehension of the human mind. But we must believe by faith, as we will most likely never be privileged enough to see the Sacred Mysteries unfold as many of the saints did. Imagine the graces that we receive when, by faith and not sight, we truly unite ourselves to the Most Holy Sacrifice of the Mass with the reverence and worship of the saints who were actually gifted to witness it.

6 comments:

AquinaSavio: said...

Great post, and so true.

I've seen Masses where they didn't ring the bells at the elevation of the Body...they used chimes. So it sounds like music from a fairy tale and the fairy godmother is appearing. I first wondered if the musicians thought that it was a magic act.

AquinaSavio: said...

By the way, Paramedicgirl, can you explain why some people strike their breast three times during the elevation of the Body and the elevation of the Blood? I know that there is some special prayer that goes with it.

BellaEmme said...

Thanks for this post! Its awesome!

Karin said...

aquinasavio...

striking of the breast three times...

here is a good explanation ...

Striking of the Breast

How:
With either a fist or with the tips of the fingers, held close together, strike your chest over the heart to express regret and sorrow 2
When:
at the Mass, formally: at each "mea culpa" during the Confiteor; at the Nobis Quoque Peccatoribus (priest); three times during the Agnus Dei; and three times during the Domine, Non Sum Dignus
informally: at the "forgive us our trespasses" ("dimitte nobis debita nostra") in the "Our Father"; any time to express penitence or remorse inside or outside of the Liturgy

http://www.fisheaters.com/posture.html

AquinaSavio: said...

Thanks, Karin. :)

Karin said...

your welcome :)